Blood River, Devil's Pulpit, Gartness, Scotland:

Blood River, Devil's Pulpit, Gartness, Scotland:

When people first hear about Devil’s Pulpit, they might assume it is a place of fright and horror. A cold, dreaded place filled with fear and uncertainty. But what if I told you Devil’s Pulpit, found in southeastern Calloway County near New Concord, was a serene and peaceful place, filled with natural beauty and wonder? Devil’s Pulpit is located about 200 yards off Deerberry Lane in the Blood River bottoms. This rock formation sits up high on a steep hill overlooking the valley below. Situated at about 500 feet above sea level, the pulpit rises 130 feet above the river and provides a great vista. The only sign of civilization is a communications tower in the distance. Various types of trees can be seen everywhere, with a few of them even growing on top of the rock. But why would such a place be known as “Devil’s Pulpit”? There certainly isn’t anything frightening about the hill. In fact, it reminded me a little of the Smoky Mountains (partially because it was 35° and spitting snow when I explored it). However, according to local legend, something terrible occurred around these famed rocks.

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3 comments: Leave Your Comments

  1. . . .what was the terrible thing that happened?

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  2. A. It's in Kentucky, not Scotland 36.55925 N / 88.17082 W B. The image is enhanced C. there's a story about a young girl who wanted to hide her horse from the Union soldiers for fear of them killing the horse. She found a spot near the river and returned daily to feed the horse. One day a Union soldier was there, wounded, and she took to caring for him daily, too. They fell in love, she got pregnant, her abusive psycho dad found them one day in an embrace. Taboo enough was it to be pregnant out of wedlock, but to be impregnated by a Union soldier in the South was above and beyond offense. Enraged, her father killed the soldier with a knife and then turned the knife on his daughter. We don't know the fate of the horse.

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